A Post for Romance Writer's Weekly

September 9, 2014

 

This week, fresh questions posed to the writers of Romance Writer's Weekly, come to us via the lovely Beth Carter

 

Brenda Margriet was the previous stop.  Be sure to check her out if you missed her.

 

1. What’s your favorite aspect of novel writing? Dialogue? Setting? Conflict? Narration? Explain.

 

Choosing a favorite is difficult because I love all aspects, but my favorite thing to do is inserting the emotion, creating and building the tension, evoking all the senses. When a reader immerses herself/himself in a book, they are joining the world you've created. They deserve to feel every single thing your characters are feeling.

 

2. How do you choose the setting for your plot? Are they always similar settings or does it vary? (i.e., small town, big city, castle, etc.)

 

I have several stories that are set in small towns and a few that are set in large cities, one with an international setting and one fantasy story where I've created the entire world. When I get an idea for a story, which generally begins by a flash of a scene that pops into my head, I get an impression of where it takes place. The setting comes to life, as much as any character. 

 

3. I’m a big six-word memoir fan. (Hemingway even wrote one.) Describe your writing day using just six words.

 

Coffee. Writing. Reviewing. Revising. Researching. Reading.

 

 

Collette Cameron is up next. She writes awesome historical romance. Follow me over to visit her.

 

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SUSAN SCOTT SHELLEY | ROMANCE AUTHOR

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